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Posts for tag: Bunions

By Mid-Michigan Foot & Ankle Center
September 30, 2019
Category: Podiatry
Tags: Bunions  

With the ability to cause nagging discomfort throughout the day and prohibit daily movements as simple as walking, bunions can quickly turn from a barely noticeable bump on your toe, to a painful deformity that detracts from your over wellbeing. Fortunately, if caught early, you can prevent this podiatric issue from developing into a serious problem. Read on to learn if you could be suffering from this condition, and whether you should take a visit to your local podiatrist.

 

Signs That You May Have a Bunion

Generally forming on the side of your big toe, bunions are hard, bony lumps that are often caused by wearing poorly-fitted shoes (especially high heels), having genetic predispositions, or experiencing a foot injury. If you think that you may have a bunion, be on the lookout for these symptoms:

  • A bony protrusion at the base of your toe
  • A generally red discoloration
  • A feeling of tightness in previously comfortable shoes

The above-listed symptoms describe the beginning stages of a bunion, a point during which your podiatrist will likely recommend a conservative approach to treatment. However, you may require more extensive medical care if you begin to notice these signs:

  • Persistent pain and swelling
  • Periodic numbness of the foot
  • Restricted and slowed movement of the toe/foot

 

Treatments

For less serious bunion cases, ones in which there isn’t pain yet and movement is still unrestricted, your podiatrist may recommend:

  • Soaking your foot in warm water
  • Taking anti-inflammatory medications such as Aspirin
  • Wearing appropriate shoe inserts
  • Avoiding tight-fitting footwear

In severe bunion cases, your podiatrist will likely recommend a more rigorous treatment approach in order to alleviate pain and increase mobility. Some of these options include:

  • Custom-made orthotics to maintain toe alignment
  • Regular physical therapy and a specialized exercise regiment
  • Bunionectomy, a surgery to remove the bunion and realign the foot (this is only necessary in the most extreme of cases)

 

Concerned? Contact Us

If you feel that bunions are disrupting your life, then take the pro-active approach and schedule an appointment at our office to learn how to regain your health.

By Mid-Michigan Foot & Ankle Center
May 03, 2019
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Bunions   Bunion Surgery  

A bunion is one of the most common foot deformities, often affecting the joint at the base of the big toe. Anyone can develop this painful condition but it most often occurs in women. A bunion affects the structure of the foot, causing the joint to become enlarged, which causes the big toe to lean inward towards the other toes. In some cases, the big toe even overlaps the toes. This deformed joint may often become red or swollen, especially when wearing certain shoes or after certain physical activities.

A bunion is a gradual deformity, which means that as soon as you begin to notice changes in the joint or you start to experience symptoms you should consult a podiatrist. While the only way to correct the deformity is through surgery this is usually the last treatment option. After all, a foot doctor can often create a treatment plan that will reduce pain and prevent the deformity from progressing without needing to turn to surgery.

The first course of treatment is usually more conservative. You may be able to manage your bunion pain and swelling by:

  • Taking over-the-counter NSAIDs
  • Icing the bunion for up to 15 minutes at a time, 2-3 times a day
  • Placing orthotics into your shoes to alleviate pressure on the joint (talk to your podiatrist about creating custom orthotics)
  • Splinting or taping the foot to improve the structural alignment
  • Wearing appropriate and supportive footwear that doesn’t put pressure on the toes or bunion
  • Applying a bunion pad over the area to prevent a callus from forming while wearing shoes
  • Avoiding certain activities and sports that could exacerbate your condition

For many people, these lifestyle changes and simple at-home treatment options are all that’s needed to reduce bunion pain and discomfort, and to prevent the problem from getting worse. Of course, if you find that at-home care isn’t providing you with relief, or if bunion pain is persistent or severe, then you should turn to a podiatrist for an evaluation. Not sure if you have a bunion or not? Call your foot doctor.

When should someone consider bunion surgery?

As we mentioned earlier, bunion surgery is considered a last resort when all other treatment options have been exhausted and they haven’t helped get your bunion symptoms under control. You may also want to consider getting bunion surgery if:

  • Your bunion is large and makes it difficult to wear shoes
  • Your bunion pain is severe and chronic
  • You have trouble walking or moving around because of your bunion
  • Your bunion is affecting your quality of life

It can take up to 6 months to fully recover from traditional bunion surgery so it’s important to discuss all of your treatment options with your podiatrist to find the most effective method for getting your bunion symptoms under control.

By Mid-Michigan Foot & Ankle Center
August 01, 2018
Category: proper footwear
Tags: Bunions   Hammertoes   painful  

For hundreds of years, high heels have been a major fashion statement. Although they are extremely stylish, many high heels are not designed to support the foot in a healthy manner. Anyone who wears a pair of high heels can tell you how painful they can make your feet feel after walking in them all day, but the damage a heel does goes deeper than that. High heels can hurt your feet, legs, posture and back.

Our feet are designed to be flat against the ground. The ground naturally keeps our feet firm and in the proper shape with the forefoot and heel planted firmly on the ground. Now that we wear shoes, our natural foot shape has changed over time.  This is especially true with high heels.  High heels make the feet feel as if they are constantly walking uphill which adds additional pressure. Constant uphill pressure can lead to pain and metatarsalgia. Other common risks are hammertoes and bunions.

High heels also change your center of gravity. They make your body lean unnaturally forward to compensate for the higher heel, and this overcompensation can cause the shortening of your calf muscles as well as very painful shin splints.

Your knees can also be affected by high heels and their extra pressure. When we walk in a typical manner, our knees do not constantly bend. With high heels, it has been shown with studies that the knees constantly bend. This constant pressure can lead to swelling, pain and osteoarthritis later on.

Because your center of gravity has changed due to high heels and the muscles begin to shorten, your back can become affected. When the lower back muscles are affected, you may experience painful spasms that make it hurt to walk.

High heels can be very detrimental to the health of your feet and your ankles. Not only can they hurt muscles in the body permanently, but they can also cause deformities of the feet. Instead of a pair of high heels, opt for a short-heeled wedge sandal. Not only are they fashionable, but they have less painful long-term effects to the body.

If you hurt your feet by wearing a pair of high heels, then it is time to call a podiatrist. Call Dr. Andrew H. Cohen, of Mid-Michigan Foot & Ankle Center, located in Saginaw and Bay City, Michigan. You can reach our office at 989-790-8009 or make an appointment online today. High heels do not have to cause you grief.

By Mid-Michigan Foot & Ankle Center
February 08, 2018
Tags: Bunions   Ingrown Toenails   Exercise   Shoes   podiatrist   pronation   suffer  

More than 24 million people participate in aerobics. Aerobic dance has become a sport where people can stay in shape, lose weight and have fun while doing so. There are different forms of aerobics including low-impact, swim, and high-impact. Dance is still the predominant form and may be inspired by ballet, country line dancing, salsa or even hip-hop. An aerobic dance session includes a warm-up stretch followed by dancing to music, usually at a fast pace. Some of the workout regimens are geared to high impact cardiovascular workout.

It's a good idea to see a podiatrist specializing in sports medicine before beginning an aerobics regimen. The podiatrist can examine your feet, gait, and natural biomechanics to see how much of a risk your feet face when partaking in aerobic exercise.

Effects on the Feet

Because aerobic dancing involves quick side to side movements, jumping, and leaping for extended periods of time, proper care of the feet plays a critical part in keeping the entire body fit. Without proper care, the feet and ankles can suffer from severe overuse injuries.

If your feet suffer from excess pronation or your ankles tend to turn inward or outward too much, it's especially important to see a podiatrist. They may recommend the use of an orthotic device, especially if you plan to partake in aerobic activities.

Proper shoes are crucial to successful, injury-free aerobics. Shoes should provide sufficient cushioning and shock absorption to balance the pressure on the foot that is many times greater than the pressure from walking. They must also have good side-to-side stability.  Shoes should also have thick upper leather or strap support to provide stability and to prevent slippage of the foot.  Make sure shoes have a toe box that is high enough to prevent irritation of toes and nails. If toes and nails are irritated it can cause hammertoes, bunions, calluses, and ingrown toenails as a result.

Once you've found the proper shoes, tie them securely, but not too tightly. Make sure there is enough room in the toe box. Double-tie the laces to prevent them from becoming loose and tripping you up during your exercise.

If you do injure yourself during an aerobic dance class, it is important to seek the help of a podiatrist right away. Simple foot pain can lead to larger, more severe problems down the road. Call Dr. Andrew H. Cohen, of Mid-Michigan Foot & Ankle Center, located in Saginaw and Bay City, Michigan. Call 989-790-8009 or make an appointment online today. Make your feet our top priority.

By Mid-Michigan Foot & Ankle Center
July 12, 2017
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Bunions   Flat Feet   pronation   Morton Neuroma   heel  

When we are babies and just learning how to walk, it isn’t uncommon to find ourselves with our feet and legs pointed inward or outward at a funny angle. Eventually, as time and practice occurs, along with the strengthening of the muscles, this rotation is gradually lost and we typically walk with straight legs and feet.  Some people are not so lucky though. Their feet and legs are considered pronated or rotated outward away from the body.

Foot pronation can be serious and is very important to correct early on if possible. Although not all pronation is caught at an early stage, there are still ways to improve the effects that it has on the body and your health.

Signs of Pronation

  • The heel is turned out and away from the center of the body
  • The forefoot is shifted outward from the heel
  • The inner ankle is bulging
  • The legs are turned inward

Sometimes people with pronated feet also have flat feet. Not all pronated feet are flat and not all flat feet are pronated. Sometimes the two are paired and other times they are not. Pronation that is severe can cause major issues for the body and everyday life.

Short Term Effects:

  • Alter the alignment of the pelvis, feet, ankle and back
  • Causes tired feet
  • Strains the feet
  • Causes abnormal motion in the joints

Long Term Effects:

Pronated feet are a deformity, that left untreated can become more severe. This type of disorder should be evaluated by a podiatrist right away. Corrective surgery and orthotics can be used to aid a person suffering from the disorder to find comfort and live a normal lifestyle.

Do you think your feet are suffering from pronation? Do your legs point away from the center of your body? Does your hips and feet ache after a day of regular activity? It’s time to call Mid-Michigan Foot & Ankle Center located in Saginaw and Bay City, Michigan. There Dr. Andrew H. Cohen will examine your feet, ankles, and gait and determine whether you have over pronation. Call 989-790-8009 or make an appointment online today. Don’t hesitate to get your feet healthy again.